The foundation and primal concept of workshop. Divided into 3 main parts which aim to provide a wide base for several physical practices.
 

 

Part 1 - Warm-up/ Self Practice
 

Movement Archery's concept of warm-up is based on the mover’s need to tune into a clear and subtle quality before their practice and execution. The routine Tom follows and teaches is inspired by concepts of Iron Shirt Chi-Kung and Hatha Yoga. The warm-up routine starts with meditation and awareness to breath and posture. It then goes on to emphasize the connection with the floor and the opening of the darkest parts of our bodies - our legs, which are also the most distant from our eyes. Demanding postures alongside gentle flow with circular motions and spirals will be introduced in order to provide better awareness of the lower parts. Another fundamental part of the warm up is preparations (or introduction) to low movement while maintaining the gentle functions of the wrists and neck as tools for balance, sensing the space and organically digesting physical information - internal and external.

Part 2 - Floorwork/ Technique
 

Tom’s technique of floor work serves as a “risk management” mechanism which ultimately, leads to freedom in a much larger scale than usually experienced by performers of a single discipline. Tom introduces dynamics of falling, rolling, collapsing, flipping and melting down in order to reduce and eventually eliminate the type of actions we usually refer to as “failure” (both in dance, athletics and martial arts). The practice is composed both of simple, almost “daily” actions, alongside “complicated” acrobatic risks without distinguishing between them or judging what’s important and unimportant. 

Part 3 - Archery
 

The “Archery” practice is a sincere attempt to create a practice of movement which lies in the space between dance, play and a gestures-free expression. The practice can be executed with two movers and up, and involves the development of both circular and sharp reactions which leads to high levels of awareness and a “tactical” mind. The movers will go through different forms of “games” which can wear strict rules and objectives or just a physical play of examining and interacting - a play we are all familiar with but tend to lose during our mature life in modern society.
Upon practicing Archery one can feel either like he or she is involved in a very skillful combat or in a passionate dance full of risks and traps. It is important to note that the name “Archery” ultimately holds nothing behind it as it constantly changes and flows into the shape that the practitioners make up according to their needs and passions.

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